AMD CPU Socket List (2009-2017)

Socket AM3 is a CPU socket for AMD processors. AM3 was launched on February 9, 2009 as the successor to Socket AM2+, alongside the initial grouping of Phenom II processors designed for it. The sole principal change from AM2+ to AM3 is support for DDR3 SDRAM. The fastest CPU for socket AM3 is the Phenom II X6 1100T.

AM3

Compatibility: Socket AM3 breaks compatibility with AM2/AM2+ processors due to a subtle change in key placement. The AM3 socket has 941 pin contacts in a different layout while AM2+ processors have 940 pins. Tom’s Hardware removed the two obstructing key pins from an AM2+ Phenom processor in order to fit it into an AM3 socket. The processor did not work in the AM3 socket, but still worked in an AM2+ socket, suggesting that compatibility issues run deeper than merely the key pins. It is likely because the built-in memory controller in AM2/AM2+ processors only supports DDR2 (unlike AM3 processors, which support both DDR2 & DDR3 memory). In fact, a few motherboards were manufactured that supported both DDR2 and DDR3, however only one type could be used at a time. Despite using an AM3 socket and despite using a north-bridge and south-bridge found on AM3 motherboards, they support any AM2, AM2+, or AM3 processor.

Heatsink: The 4 holes for fastening the heat sink to the motherboard are placed in a rectangle with lateral lengths of 48 mm and 96 mm for AMD’s sockets Socket AM2, Socket AM2+, Socket AM3, Socket AM3+ and Socket FM2. Cooling solutions should therefore be interchangeable.

AM3+ is a modification of the AM3 Socket, released in mid-2011, designed for CPUs which use the AMD Bulldozer micro architecture and retains compatibility with AM3 processors. The Vishera line of AMD CPUs also all use Socket AM3+. It is the last AMD socket for which Windows XP support officially exists.

AM3+

Technical specifications: The AM3+ Socket specification contains a few noteworthy design changes over its AM3 predecessor. The 942 pin count for the AM3+ is an increase of one compared to the AM3 Socket layout. The AM3+ Socket has larger pin socket diameter of 0.51 mm compared to 0.45 mm with the AM3 Socket. There is a faster serial link of 3400 kHz from the CPU to the power controller, compared to 400 kHz. The AM3+ Socket offers improved power regulation and power quality specifications, including an increased maximum current support of 145 A versus 110 A. There is also a redesigned CPU cooler retention harness allowing for slightly better airflow for CPU cooling, while retaining cooler backward compatibility.

Heatsink: The 4 holes for fastening the heat sink to the motherboard are placed in a rectangle with lateral lengths of 48 mm and 96 mm for AMD’s sockets Socket AM2, Socket AM2+, Socket AM3, Socket AM3+ and Socket FM2. Cooling solutions should therefore be interchangeable.

Socket FM2 is a CPU socket used by AMD’s desktop Trinity and Richland APUs to connect to the motherboard as well as Athlon X2 and Athlon X4 processors based on them. FM2 was launched on September 27, 2012. Motherboards which feature the at the time new FM2 CPU socket also utilize AMD’s at the time new A85X chip set.

FM2

The socket is very similar to FM1, based on a 31×31 grid of pins with a 5×7 central void, 3 pins missing from each corner, and a few additional key pins missing.

Compared to Socket FM1, two key pins were moved, and one more is removed, leaving 904 pins.

For available chip sets consult Fusion controller hubs (FCH).

Steamroller-based “Kaveri” APUs are not supported, see Socket FM2+ (FM2r2) and Socket FP3 (BGA-???).

Heatsink: The 4 holes for fastening the heat sink to the motherboard are placed in a rectangle with lateral lengths of 48 mm and 96 mm for AMD’s sockets Socket AM2, Socket AM2+, Socket AM3, Socket AM3+ and Socket FM2. Cooling solutions should therefore be interchangeable.

Socket AM4 is a PGA microprocessor socket used by AMD’s central processing units (CPUs) built on the Zen (including Zen+, Zen 2 and Zen 3) and Excavator micro architectures.

AM4 was launched in September 2016 and was designed to replace the sockets AM3+, FM2+ and FS1b as a single platform. It has 1331 pin slots and is the first from AMD to support DDR4 memory as well as achieve unified compatibility between high-end CPUs (previously using Socket AM3+) and AMD’s lower-end APUs (on various other sockets). In 2017 AMD made a commitment to using the AM4 platform with socket 1331 until 2020.

AM4

Features:

  • Support for Zen (including Zen+, Zen 2 and Zen 3) based family of CPUs and APUs (Ryzen, Athlon), as well as for some A-Series APUs and Athlon X4 CPUs (Bristol Ridge based on the Excavator micro architecture)
  • Supports PCIe 3.0 and 4.0
  • Supports up to 4 modules of DDR4 SDRAM in dual-channel configuration

Heatsink: The AM4 socket specifies the 4 holes for fastening the heat sink to the motherboard to be placed in the corners of a rectangle with a lateral length of 54×90 mm. Previous sockets have 48×96 mm.

Some heat sinks for older sockets are not compatible. Some cooler manufacturers, however, are reported to be offering brackets allowing previously manufactured coolers to work with AM4, while other coolers will be redesigned.

Socket TR4, also known as Socket SP3r2, is a land grid array (LGA) CPU socket designed by AMD supporting its first- and second-generation Zen-based Ryzen Thread ripper desktop processors, launched on August 10, 2017 for the high-end desktop and workstation platforms. It was succeeded by Socket sTRX4 for the third generation of Ryzen Thread ripper processors.

TR4

Socket TR4 is AMD’s second LGA socket for a consumer product after the short lived Socket 1207 FX. It is physically identical to, but electrically incompatible with both AMD’s server Socket SP3, and Socket TR4’s successor socket, Socket sTRX4.

While Socket SP3 doesn’t require a chip set, instead uti lising a system-on-a-chip design, Socket TR4 and its successor require a chip set to provide improved functionality. For Socket TR4, the AMD X399 chip set was developed, which supports a total of 64 PCI Express lanes for quad SLI/Crossfire configurations.

The socket is made by both Foxconn and Lotes.

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